Homeowners are always looking for ways to protect their houses because owning one is expensive. You have to maintain many parts of your house, and flooding that can be avoided is a needless expense. There are many ways that your house can get water damage, including nature, broken pipes, and broken appliances. But there are also ways that you can prevent flooding and water damage or at least minimize the damage, so here are some of the best techniques that you can use before you have water damage....

Make A Flood Damage Recovery Plan today!Your family may not be together if a disaster strikes, so it is important to know which types of disasters could affect your area.  Know how you’ll contact one another and reconnect if separated. Establish a family meeting place that’s familiar and easy to find. Step 1: Put together a plan by discussing these 4 questions with your family, friends, or household to start your emergency plan.How will I receive emergency alerts and warnings? What is my shelter plan? What is my evacuation route? What is my family/household communication plan?Step 2:  Consider specific needs in your household. As you prepare your plan, tailor your plans and supplies to your specific daily living needs and responsibilities. Discuss your needs and responsibilities and how people in the network can assist each other with communication, care of children, business, pets, or specific needs like the operation of durable medical equipment. Create your own personal network for specific areas where you need assistance.  Keep in mind some these factors when developing your plan:Different ages of members of your household Responsibilities for assisting others Locations frequented Dietary needs Medical needs including prescriptions and equipment Disabilities or access and functional needs including devices and equipment Languages spoken Cultural and religious considerations Pets or service animals Households with school-aged children  [ WATER DAMAGE REPAIR PROCESS ]   Step 3: Fill out a Family Emergency Plan Download and fill out a family emergency plan or use them as a guide to creating your own.Emergency Plan for Parents (PDF)  Step 4: Practice your plan with your family/household   ShareablesWallet-Sized Emergency Communication Plan (PDF) Family Emergency Communication Guide (PDF) Emergency Plan for Parents or (PDF) Emergency Plan for Kids or (PDF) Emergency Plan for Commuters (PDF) Pet owners PDF Steps to make a plan (PDF) Tips on emergency alerts and warnings (PDF) Protect Critical Documents and Valuables (PDF) Document and Insure Your Property (PDF) Emergency Financial First Aid Kit (PDF)[video poster="https://www.flooddoctorva.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/Flood-Insurance101.jpg" width="1280" height="720" mp4="https://www.flooddoctorva.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/Flood-Damage-Checklist.mp4"][/video]...

Original article posted by Allstate.com. Read it here: Flood Insurance 101You don't have to live in a high-risk flood zone to be affected by a flood. Floods and flash floods can occur anywhere, even in the desert. Just an inch of water can cause damage to your property. In fact, in the U.S., flood-related losses cost people more than a billion dollars a year.If your home isn't protected against floods, you are (unfortunately) not alone. Only 12 percent of U.S. homeowners have flood insurance, according to a 2016 poll conducted by the Insurance Information Institute.Are the remaining 88 percent just betting that a flood won't hit their homes? Or do they mistakenly believe their homeowners' policy offers protection against a flood?In either case, there's a strong argument to get better informed.HOMEOWNERS INSURANCE TYPICALLY DOES NOT COVER DAMAGE FROM FLOODSFor one, you should know that flood damage isn't typically covered by homeowners insurance. To get flood coverage, you may be able to buy a separate flood policy through the federal government's National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). A local insurance agent can help you purchase an NFIP flood policy.You should also understand that flood insurance isn't just for homes in high-risk areas. The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) says that all 50 states have experienced floods or flash floods in the past five years and that more than 20 percent of the claims it handles come from the moderate- to low-risk regions.  WHAT DOES FLOOD INSURANCE COVER?So, what may a flood policy help protect? FEMA says you can purchase coverage to help protect your home, your personal belongings, or both. Here are some of the basics for these two types of coverage: Building property coverageWhat it may help protect: The physical structure of your home and its foundation; plumbing and electrical systems; central air and heating systems; attached bookcases, cabinets and paneling; and a detached garage (other detached structures need their own policy). How it typically pays out: Replacement cost basis (what it would take to repair the home in today's dollars) for a primary residence and actual cash value for a vacation home. Maximum coverage limit: $250,000Personal contents coverage What it may help protect: Clothing, furniture and electronics; curtains; some portable appliances; freezers and the foods within them; and certain valuables like art (up to a specified limit). How it typically pays out: Actual cash value basis (takes depreciation into account). Maximum coverage limit: $100,000WHAT'S NOT TYPICALLY COVERED BY FLOOD INSURANCE?Equally important is knowing what's not covered by flood insurance. Here are some of the types of property and expenses that fall outside the scope of a basic flood insurance policy, according to the NFIP's summary of coverage:Moisture or mold/mildew damage that "could have been avoided by the homeowner" Currency, precious metals, and paper valuables like stock certificates Outdoor property such as decks, fences, patios, landscaping, wells and septic systems, and hot tubs and pools Living expenses, like temporary housing (if flood damage deems your home uninhabitable) Cars and other self-propelled vehicles (but your auto insurance may offer some coverage for your car) In addition, you'll likely find that flood insurance provides limited, if any, coverage for below-ground rooms like crawl spaces and basements, and their contents, the NFIP says. Some items in these spaces (like the furnace) are typically covered under building coverage. Others (like the washer/dryer) are usually covered under personal contents coverage. And some items — like your personal effects — may not be covered at all when they're kept in below-ground rooms. Talk to an agent to help make sure you're clear about the coverage details of a flood insurance policy and to help you make the right choices for your situation. Of course, you should also remember that a flood isn't the only potential source of water damage to a home. That's why, in addition to understanding the potential benefits of flood insurance, you should also review the coverages offered by your homeowners' insurance policy. Armed with the knowledge and insurance coverages that are right for you, you'll go a long way toward protecting your home against water damage.  ...

[vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="full_width" angled_section="no" text_align="left" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern"][vc_column width="3/4"][vc_single_image image="23352" img_size="full" add_caption="yes" qode_css_animation=""][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/4"][vc_separator type="normal" color="blue" border_width="3" el_width="80" css=".vc_custom_1476096630263{margin-left: -100px !important;padding-top: 300px !important;}"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="full_width" angled_section="no" text_align="left" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern"][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_column_text][vc_custom_heading text="Flood Insurance 101" font_container="tag:h1|font_size:60|text_align:right" use_theme_fonts="yes" css=".vc_custom_1476097429895{padding-bottom: 10px !important;}"][/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_column_text]You don't have to live in a high-risk flood zone to be affected by a flood. Floods and flash floods can occur anywhere, even in the desert. Just an inch of water can cause damage to your property. In fact, in the U.S., flood-related losses cost people more than a billion dollars a year.If your home isn't protected against floods, you are (unfortunately) not alone. Only 12 percent of U.S. homeowners have flood insurance, according to a 2016 poll conducted by the Insurance Information Institute.Are the remaining 88 percent just betting that a flood won't hit their homes? Or do they mistakenly believe their homeowners' policy offers protection against a flood?In either case, there's a strong argument to get better informed.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]...

Flood insurance is a special type of homeowner's insurance designed to shield homeowners from the financial devastation of flood damage to their home. People commonly think that flood insurance covers all losses, but insurance coverage actually breaks down what is covered by the location of the damage. Damage to the structure of a home is not treated the same way as to damage in a basement or to belongings. Flood insurance spells out what is covered in each of these areas.Residential BuildingsFlood insurance covers homes and other dwellings, including garages, against damage. This coverage includes dishwashers, furnaces, radiators, water heaters, plumbing fixtures, stoves, ovens, and refrigerators. The coverage also includes roofs, exterior and interior walls, flooring, ceilings, permanent cabinets and fixtures, electrical outlets, vents, light fixtures and ceiling fans. The coverage is for direct water damage, mold damage, and mudslides. The damage can be caused by river, lake, pond or stream flooding, or coastal floodings such as the storm surge that occurs during tropical storms and hurricanes.BasementsNational flood insurance covers basements to the extent that the losses are for items normally stored in a basement. This excludes coverage for furniture, TVs and other electronics that are not considered to be a part of a regular basement. The coverage also is for the actual structural elements of the basement. This includes unfinished walls, the foundation insulation, electrical junctions and circuit breaker boxes, central air units, fuel tanks, heat pumps, light fixtures, furnaces and water heaters. Coverage includes the cost of cleanup. Coverage excludes improvements such as flooring and finished walls. Personal Belongings Flood insurance covers items inside the home that are declared a loss, including clothing, furniture, bedding, decorative accessories, books, electronics, rugs, drapes, air conditioners, washing machines, clothes dryers, microwave ovens, photos, and paintings.Nonresidential BuildingsFlood insurance coverage for nonresidential buildings is similar to that for residential structures. Instead of providing full coverage for finished interiors, though, it mirrors the coverage provided for the interior of a basement. This means that structural coverage is only for unfinished drywall on walls and ceilings, and non-flammable insulation. Coverage does not extend to the paint on walls and ceilings. Flood loss coverage is also provided for Electrical junction and circuit breaker boxes, central air units, light fixtures, permanent cabinets, Foundation and cleanup costs. Coverage for contents includes furniture and fixtures, machinery and equipment, raw materials, and unfinished or finished goods....

CATEGORY ONE water losses originate from a clean water source. For example, if a basement supply line leaks the water travels through the dog poop on the floor that the homeowners were too lazy to pick up, is that a cat 1 loss? How clean were the floors that got affected by the "clean water"? There is more to determining the category of the loss besides where the water originated from. Water Damage Repair CATEGORY TWO water losses are approximately 75% of all losses based on my experience. Cat 2 losses include sump pump failures, toilet overflows, dishwasher discharge, and washing machine overflows just to name a few. But like others have mentioned category 1 losses can and usually do degrade to a cat 2 loss. Again look beyond where the water originated from because other factors including indoor temperatures, air circulation, and cleanliness of the indoor structure help determine what category of water you are dealing with. Cat 2 water losses usually require a disinfectant to be applied to affected surfaces. Water Damage Mitigation CATEGORY THREE water losses are grossly contaminated and require the use of PPE ( personal protective equipment ) and an AFD ( air filtration device ). Cat 3 losses require removal of contaminated porous building materials such as drywall, carpet, carpet cushion etc. although for the life of me I can't understand why you don't have to remove wood structural members?? Different topic for a different day. Cat 3 losses usually require HWE ( hot water extraction ) and the use of a disinfectant on affected surfaces. Toxic Water Damage Repair CATEGORY FOUR water losses are specialty losses that if you are a newbie and you're dealing with this then I assure you that you are incapable of handling this and you should exit stage left. And yes for you other responders there is a category 4. Category 4 losses are water losses that are mixed with fuel oils, oil or any other "out of the ordinary" chemical that is mixed with the water. These losses require environmental waste hauling companies. After removal of chemically contaminated water the loss is treated as a category 3 loss but requires MUCH more cleaning after removal of contaminated building materials.In conclusion, the IICRC S500 guide for water damage restoration is just that, A GUIDE. Usually, it is a minimum guideline to be followed. For example in construction building codes are a minimum guideline. The best builders go way above and beyond minimum guidelines as do the best water damage restoration companies....