There can be many unexpected health problems following a flood. In the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey, researchers organized by the New York Times found the E. coli count inside some Houston-area homes to be 135 times higher than normal. In the wake of Hurricane Katrina, five people died and 22 lost limbs because of Vibrio bacteria present after the flood waters receded....

Homeowners are always looking for ways to protect their houses because owning one is expensive. You have to maintain many parts of your house, and flooding that can be avoided is a needless expense. There are many ways that your house can get water damage, including nature, broken pipes, and broken appliances. But there are also ways that you can prevent flooding and water damage or at least minimize the damage, so here are some of the best techniques that you can use before you have water damage....

If you live in a coastal area in the south or on the East Coast, hurricanes are a fact of life. From every June to November, you have to keep one eye on the tropics to know if you are at risk. If you do experience a hurricane, it can do some serious damage to your home. Here are the parts of your home that you want to make sure you check after a hurricane. Siding The high winds from hurricanes can wreak havoc on your siding. Wind can shear off pieces of siding and also damage the siding itself. Hail or other debris hitting your siding can cause dents or chip off paint. While a visible inspection is a good idea, it also is a good idea to have an insurance adjuster look for damage. Outdoor Machinery Any outdoor machinery, such as your air conditioner compressor, need to be inspected after a hurricane. Wind can send debris into the machinery that can cause damage to things like fan blades. If the hurricane caused flooding, either due to rain or storm surge, it can affect the inner workings of your compressor, including the electrical systems. Your RoofImage source: K Graber Co. Metal Roofing One of the parts of your house that will take the brunt of a hurricane is your roof. High winds can shear off shingles, and they also can send tree branches and other debris flying into your roof, which can cause significant damage. Even metal roofs should be checked for damage. Keep in mind that not all damage is evident to the naked eye, so it's a good idea to have an insurance adjuster or roofing company inspect your roof. Crawl Space One of the biggest issues with hurricanes is flooding. The storms produce tremendous rainfall, with 10 inches or more in some areas, even for minor hurricanes. If you live near the coast, flooding from storm surge also is an issue. That's why it's important to inspect your crawl space after a hurricane. Any small amount of flooding can send water into your crawl space. If you got any water inside it, mold could become a concern. You should make sure to thoroughly dry out the area and work with a licensed mold remediation contractor to ensure it is cleaned up properly. Gutters and downspouts The winds from hurricanes can really do a number on your gutters and downspouts, and you may not even want to wait until the hurricane passes to inspect them. When there is a lull in the weather and winds and rain have died down, you may want to do a quick check of your gutters and downspouts to ensure they are working correctly. Gutters that get clogged or knocked offline can exacerbate problems with water because they can't drain rainwater properly, which can lead to water leaks in your home. Exterior AreasImage Source: Today’s Homeowner Once a hurricane has passed, it's important to check exterior areas of your home for downed trees and other debris. Pay particular attention to any trees that look like they may be in danger of collapsing or any trees or branches that have fallen on power lines. If you have after-market technology installed, make sure those are inspected as well. These can present serious hazards to your home and your family long after the hurricane is over.Hurricanes are fierce storms, and they can do serious damage to your home, not all of which is visible to the naked eye. It's important to thoroughly inspect your home after a hurricane and also to have an insurance adjuster take a look both inside and out. Any damage that you find needs to be reported to your insurance company as soon as possible so you can initiate a claim....

[vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="full_width" angled_section="no" text_align="left" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern"][vc_column][vc_column_text] Part One: For Owners of Damaged Property RESEARCH Property owners should research any party before hiring them to do work. A quick online search of a company or an individual’s name can help spot red flags. Better yet, ask for references from recent projects and see how they respond. Don’t be scared to follow up on a few references to verify information. When you have settled on a contractor, put everything down in writing. Use a good contract template, make sure the contract has a set price, and include terminology that requires approval for any change orders or alterations not in the contract. UTILIZE NOTICES By utilizing notices, property owners can better understand what is going on with their project. It’s a good idea to request every party on the project provide some preliminary notice that includes a description and price of their work. Notices create better communication and transparency on the job site, and any potential issues can be nipped in the bud. USE WAIVERS A conditional waiver waives lien rights, but only for the work that has been completed. They must be drafted with great care and attention to detail, but when done right, they’re fair. Partial waivers waive lien rights for some portion of the overall project, and conditional waivers only waive lien rights for work that has been paid for. By properly pairing a conditional or partial waiver with payment, a subcontractor only gives up lien rights when they can safely do so. INSURANCE Claims should be made as soon as they can be put together. Many states (Louisiana included) have specific time limits by which insurance companies must pay undisputed amounts when proof of loss has been submitted. If those amounts aren’t timely paid, insurance companies can be found in bad faith and could be subject to treble damages and penalties. Insurance may not cover everything, and sometimes funds won’t be available at all, so make sure your insurance dollars stretch as far as they possibly can. Aid may come in other forms and from other places, but never assume that it will. In any event, don’t let your guard down – protect whatever aid you do receive as if it’s your last dollar.It’s a good idea to keep records of anything even remotely related to your insurance claims. Be sure to pay attention to change orders and progress payments from your insurer as well. Typically, an insurer will refuse to pay for changes that were not originally contemplated or subsequently approved by the insurance provider. As for progress payments, insurers often subtract the amount of an owner’s deductible when paying the contractor. Owners will be liable for the difference. Part Two: For Construction Companies LICENSING Where licensing is required, only perform work you are licensed to do. Licensing requirements vary from state to state. For out-of-state contractors, it’s important to understand the requirements of the state where work will be done. Just because you are licensed in one state does not mean that license is valid everywhere else. That being said, after a disaster it is fairly common for a state to suspend some licensing requirements or to issue emergency waivers to help with recovery efforts. This does not happen after every disaster, and even when requirements are relaxed, not all licenses will be affected. A failure to hold the proper licensure could result in serious penalties and affect your right to payment. In many states, unlicensed contractors have limited lien rights or none at all. RESEARCH Properly vetting the parties you’ll be working with must be a high priority. It’s not always possible to work with someone you’re familiar with. When working with someone for the first time, do your research. Do an online search for their name or the name of their business. Ask them about licensure, insurance, and prior projects-referrals from past contractors and subs should shed a lot of light on them.It also might be helpful to ask if they’ve done insurance or disaster recovery work before. After accepting a job or hiring another party, put everything down in writing. LIEN AND NOTICE LAWS CHANGE FROM STATE TO STATE To secure payment, contractors, subs, and suppliers need to know the applicable lien and notice laws. These laws vary greatly from state to state, so pay attention if you’re traveling to perform work. Even if you’re at home, these laws will be more important than ever. If you don’t think you want to file or enforce a lien, there’s still no harm in preserving your lien rights. Regardless of what the law requires, send preliminary notice on every project. Doing so lets an owner know you’re providing work on their property and will help nip some disputes in the bud. USE PARTIAL AND CONDITIONAL LIEN WAIVERS Utilizing waivers is a great way to make sure a project goes smoothly. Using these waivers should speed up the payment process while limiting the risk of waiving lien rights. When using a partial waiver, only a portion of lien rights are given up. With conditional waivers, rights are only waived if and when payment comes. It is incredibly important that waivers are properly drafted. Otherwise, you may be prematurely giving up lien rights. Pay very, very close attention to the language of anything you sign, especially lien waivers. DEALING WITH INSURANCE Insurance checks rarely come quickly, and waiting for payment could put your lien rights at risk. It may frustrate the property owner, but take the necessary steps to preserve lien rights. Also, industry members should beware of issues that arise with progress payments as well as the effects of change orders. When progress payments are made by an insurer, often times they will subtract the amount of the property owner’s deductible. The remaining sum will be owed by the owner, but these amounts are often overlooked – be sure to protect your recovery. Do not underestimate the effects of change orders, either. Changes and adjustments may not be covered by the insurer and could lead to disputes with the owner.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="full_width" angled_section="no" text_align="left" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern"][vc_column][qode_blog_carousel_titled posts_title_tag="h4" posts_shown="4"][/vc_column][/vc_row]...

Regardless of where you live, there is always a possibility that your home could be damaged by a flood. Even a minor flood can cause significant damage, so all homeowners should be prepared for a worst-case scenario. By learning more about what flood damage repair work may cost, you can be proactive about preparing for this type of unfortunate situation. Understanding the Scope of the Damage The cost of flood damage repair will vary based on numerous factors. A minor flood that covers only an inch or two in your home and that is cleaned up quickly may have minimal cost.On the other hand, if flood waters rise by several feet, and particularly if the waters remain in place for more than a few hours, the damage can be astronomical. All personal items on that level of the home may be destroyed. Everything from flooring to drywall to electrical work and more may need to be replaced. There is also a chance that other areas of the home could be damaged by mold growth related to high humidity levels in the home. Reviewing Your Insurance Policy Many homeowners may be inclined to file a home insurance claim at the first sign of this type of damage. However, a typical home insurance policy does not cover water or mold damage. You generally need to purchase this coverage separately or through an addendum to your standard home insurance policy before a flood or mold growth situation develops. It is essential that you review your coverage today and that you update it as needed to ensure that it is as protective as possible. Paying for the Damage If you are able to file a claim, you will need to pay for your home insurance deductible, which commonly may be between one to two percent of the insured amount. Remember that any portion of the repair work not covered by insurance will be yours to pay for on your own. You may also need to pay for a hotel or other lodging options while your home is being repaired.You can see that even if you have flood coverage, this type of situation can still cost a fortune. All homeowners should have cash in savings for use in emergencies. However if for some reason you don't have a savings or the damage goes beyond what you can afford, you do have options:Credit Card Advances Personal Installment Loans Cash Out Refinance Loan Home Equity Line of CreditAs a homeowner, it is important to think about all possible risks and perils that you may face and to confirm that your insurance policy covers them. Then, ensure that you have cash on hand at all times to pay the deductible and any additional expenses that you may incur in an emergency situation. ...

One of the most panic-inducing issues any homeowner can experience is a burst pipe or even a leak. A burst pipe can be expensive to repair, cause significant water damage, and lead to additional issues in your home as well. Whether you’ve sprung a leak or have a burst pipe, it is important you act quickly, as this can help to reduce the amount of damage your home incurs. Here are four important steps you should take in case of a significant leak. Turn off the water The most important thing you will need to do after a pipe bursts is to turn off the water to your home. If you are able to identify where the pipe is located, you may be able to turn off only a portion of your water. However, to minimize the risk, you should turn off the water to your whole home until you can better identify the source. Make Minor Repairs If the pipe is accessible, you could also try to make some minor and temporary repairs. With a burst pipe, you could often make a quick repair by using duct tape, plumbing glue, or other simple solutions. If you are in a pinch, use rubber bands, nail polish, or even glue to plug the leak until you can get a more professional repair. While these are not meant to last for a very long time, they could help you to handle the problem until you are able to get a professional to your home. Plumber As soon as you are able to, contact a local plumber. If the issue calls for it, it may be worthwhile to pay extra for emergency plumbing service. These plumbers will be able to come to your home at any time of day or night and will be able to handle the problem on the spot. This can include fixing the broken pipe, replacing the pipe entirely, and making any additional repairs necessary to ensure future repairs are not needed. Water Damage Repair While fixing the pipe is the most important step, you also need to clean up any water damage as soon as possible. Through the help of your insurance company, you should be able to identify a contractor that will be able to dry up the water and replace any drywall, carpet, or other elements that need to be replaced. Drying techniques and drying equipment today is significantly better than what was available even 5 years ago. Even if you’ve got a bit of a flood on your hands, new water extraction techniques should be able to sort your home out.Once you notice a leak, it is important to start reacting as quickly as possible. By following these four tips, you can help to minimize the damage of the broken pipe and start the repair process....

If you recently experienced a situation where flood water had gotten into your house, taking action immediately to ensure damage is minimal is best. Here are some steps to follow if you are dealing with this scenario. Contact A Restoration Service It is best to let a water restoration service clean your home's interior, especially if the flood is the result of a nearby water source overflow. Professionals will use high-powered pumping equipment to remove all moisture from your home. They will then dry the areas affected with commercial-grade fans. If drywall or carpeting became wet, these items will be removed and replaced so mold does not grow as a result of moisture. The service will then conduct a cleaning process of the structural areas affected by the flood to ensure mold growth does not occur. Get Personal Items Out Of Water If Possible As soon as a water damage service is contacted, grab any personal items that have a chance of being salvaged. This needs to be done while wearing appropriate clothing if bacteria is a concern. Plastic gloves and waders will protect the skin appropriately. Place any items you are trying to salvage in a dry location and consider using a fan to aid in removing any moisture left behind. All items will need to be wiped down with a cleaning solution made especially for the stopping of mold growth. It is best not to bother with trying to salvage food items, plastic kids toys, or paperwork. Find An Area To Stay During Renovation Work If floodwater is present in areas where bedrooms are located in the home, or if there is a worry about structural damage to the house, staying off-site is a must. You will be responsible for finding your own housing, even if you are a renter. Find a friend or loved one to stay with, if possible, or consider options such as a hotel, corporate housing, or a short-lease apartment rental. A restoration service will give those living in the home an estimated date that people can return to the abode. Get A Hold Of Your Homeowner's Insurance Company If you have flood insurance, call your provider at the first signs of a problem. An adjuster will come to the home to do an assessment of the damage and will help in the expediting of compensation to pay for repair work that needs to be done. Some homeowner's insurance policies will cover moisture damage, so it is best to contact your agent to find out if the flooding situation is covered if you do not have a separate flood insurance policy. Resources: American Red Cross, St. Louis Corporate Housing, Bankrate, WAFB, The Nest...

In general, the words homeowners insurance automatically makes you assume that it covers only the things in your home. However, the truth is that home insurance is going to cover you for more things than you could guess, even if it has absolutely nothing to do with you being at home sometimes. In this list today I am going to cover the top ten things that a homeowners insurance policy covers that you probably didn’t know it did. [ Flood Doctor Water Damage Restoration ]1. Counterfeit Money   I am not sure if you have ever experienced the embarrassment of being told that your money is fake when you attempt to pay for something. However, I can assure you that it isn’t a good feeling.   You feel embarrassed, and some people will even start to treat you like a criminal. But fear not, your home insurance may cover that. You should check your policy specifics to see under which policy provision counterfeit money is covered and how much of it your policy will cover.   2. Kidnap & Ransoms   If you are a movie fanatic like me then I am sure you have seen the movie Ransom, it’s probably one of my favorite movies. The truth is, however, that none of us know what we would do in that situation or how our family would react to us being kidnapped. Fortunately, your homeowner’s insurance may cover your ransom up to a certain amount to assist with getting you back home safely. It isn’t something you want ever to happen, but it’s great to know there is some help if it does.   3. Identity Theft   Have you ever looked at your credit report and noticed that you had a credit card or new home that you didn’t know existed? Ever received a phone bill in the mail for a phone you don’t own. More than likely, your Identity has been stolen, and you might not be prepared for the time and emotional rollercoaster that is to come when you try to fix it. Your homeowner’s insurance considers your identity as personal property and may cover you for it, so learn how your policy works and how it may cover you.   4. Mortgage Payment Protection   If your home is destroyed by a covered loss, like heavy snow, hurricanes, or a meteorite falling from the sky. The mortgage company is still expecting their monthly payment to come through.   Paying for anything that you aren’t using is always a bummer, but could you imagine the nerve of a mortgage company looking for payment when they know you just lost the complete use of your home? Well, the truth is that you actually still owe them for the loan. But don’t worry, your home insurance coverage has a clause called “loss of use,” and that will cover your mortgage payments.   5. Court Settlements   Let’s face it; you aren’t going to win everything in life. Most of us are surprised when we win anything, but on the off chance that you lose a lawsuit filed by your neighbor or your ex-best friend, your homeowner’s has you covered. Your policy has a liability clause that will cover your court costs as well as money for your attorney or any settlements you have to pay. It’s best to read your policy to understand its limits.   6. Spoiled Food   If you have ever thrown out spoiled food because of a power outage, then this is going to drive you crazy. You could have been reimbursed for that food if it became spoiled due to a covered loss. Did a tree fall and knock out your power? Did a storm knock out your power? Since those are types of covered loss, and the food is considered personal property, it is covered by your homeowner’s insurance. So, before you throw out your spoiled food, take pictures of it, even if it stinks. You probably can be reimbursed.   7. Tenant Rent   Owning a duplex seems like it would be fun.   I mean, you get to live rent free because the tenant in the other unit is paying for both your mortgages. What happens if neither you or your tenant can occupy your home due to a covered loss? Well, your loss of use provision kicks in again, and they will pay you (up to a certain amount) the loss of income from your tenant. As always, check your policy specifics.   8. Student Property (On Campus)   More than 40% of students live on campus.   If you are one of that 40%, then be happy to know that your parent’s homeowner's insurance has you covered if your property is stolen, lost or broken. If you are a parent, you can rest assured that your homeowners' insurance is traveling with your student to protect you and them for a covered loss of personal property. Most people would never think to reach out to their home insurance for a case like this, but, it’s probably covered so start reaching out.   9. Parents Property (Assisted Living)   If you are financially responsible for your parent and they live in an assisted living property, then, just like for your student, your homeowner’s policy will cover them. If they lose something, have something stolen, or it’s broken by a covered loss, your home insurance policy will cover the item. Our parents are significant to us, and the last thing we want to do is hear something they cherished was lost or stolen so knowing that they are protected is always great to hear. Read your policy specifics for how your policy will work.   10. Crime Scene Cleanup   I can’t imagine coming home to a crime scene.   We all have our favorite episode of CSI, Dexter, or Criminal Minds, but in reality, I am sure none of us could actually stomach a crime scene and definitely wouldn’t be able to clean it up. Whatever the crime scene is, your homeowners will help you with covering the cost to have it cleaned up. If this happened in your home either to you or your loved ones, the last thing you want to do is have to clean it up. Check your policy for all of the details. Has your Sump-Pump Failed? Read this...

[vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="full_width" angled_section="no" text_align="left" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern" z_index=""][vc_column][vc_row_inner row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left" css_animation=""][vc_column_inner][vc_column_text] FLOODING: A GAME OF INCHES [/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_row_inner row_type="row" type="grid" text_align="left" css_animation=""][vc_column_inner][vc_column_text] Small Increases Cause Big Problems | Flood Damage Virginia [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="small" position="center" color="#000000" up="5" down="15"][vc_column_text] Think of flooding like a nearly full bathtub: when the water level increases, even a bit higher, it overflows. The sea level around coastal areas in Virginia has slowly risen over the years and is now overflowing more often into our streets during high tides and rainstorms. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" up="25" down="25"][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="full_width" angled_section="no" text_align="left" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern" padding_top="55" padding_bottom="55" z_index=""][vc_column][vc_row_inner row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left" css_animation=""][vc_column_inner width="1/6"][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width="2/3"][vc_video link="https://youtu.be/AkP2nWV_g8A" el_width="80" align="center"][vc_column_text] Flooding In Virginia Has Increased 250% Since 2000 and Continues rising [/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width="1/6"][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="full_width" angled_section="no" text_align="left" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern" background_color="#ffffff" padding_top="25" padding_bottom="25" z_index=""][vc_column][vc_row_inner row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left" css_animation=""][vc_column_inner width="1/2"][vc_column_text] Just Under 5 Inches Of Sea Level Rise Has Led To 250% More Flooding Since 2000.1 [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="small" position="left" color="#000000" transparency="1" up="5" down="15"][vc_column_text]When the ocean rises high enough, high tides cause flooding even on sunny days. Even though the sea level has only risen by a few inches, tidal flooding has increased over 200% on average, nationally.2 Because certain causes, like changes in the Gulf Stream or land sinkage, impact coastal areas differently, the change in flooding varies by location. In Hampton Roads, even though the sea level has only risen a few inches, flooding has gone up by 250% since 2000.3 This is widespread: in Portsmouth, 1 in 3 people have reported that they experience flooding a few times a year.4[/vc_column_text][vc_empty_space][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width="1/2"][vc_single_image image="23931" img_size="full" add_caption="yes" alignment="center" qode_css_animation=""][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_row_inner row_type="row" type="grid" text_align="left" css_animation="" background_color="#ffffff"][vc_column_inner][progress_bar gradient="no" title="2005" title_color="#000000" percent="20" percent_color="#dd3333" active_background_color="#1e73be" active_border_color="#ffffff" noactive_background_color="#ffffff" noactive_background_color_transparency="0" height="10px"][progress_bar gradient="no" title_color="#000000" percent="35" percent_color="#dd3333" active_background_color="#1e73be" active_border_color="#ffffff" noactive_background_color="#ffffff" noactive_background_color_transparency="0" height="10px"][progress_bar gradient="no" title_color="#000000" percent="50" percent_color="#dd3333" active_background_color="#1e73be" active_border_color="#ffffff" noactive_background_color="#ffffff" noactive_background_color_transparency="0" height="10px"][progress_bar gradient="no" title_color="#000000" percent="65" percent_color="#dd3333" active_background_color="#1e73be" active_border_color="#ffffff" noactive_background_color="#ffffff" noactive_background_color_transparency="0" height="10px"][progress_bar gradient="no" title_color="#000000" percent="90" percent_color="#dd3333" active_background_color="#1e73be" active_border_color="#ffffff" noactive_background_color="#ffffff" noactive_background_color_transparency="1" height="10px"][progress_bar gradient="no" title="2018" title_color="#000000" percent="250" percent_color="#dd3333" active_background_color="#1e73be" active_border_color="#ffffff" noactive_background_color="#ffffff" noactive_background_color_transparency="1" height="10px"][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="full_width" angled_section="no" text_align="left" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern" background_color="#ffffff" padding_top="25" padding_bottom="25" z_index=""][vc_column][vc_empty_space height="55px"][vc_row_inner row_type="row" type="grid" text_align="left" css_animation=""][vc_column_inner width="1/2"][vc_column_text] HIGHER SEAS, HIGHER TIDES [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="small" position="left" color="#000000" transparency="1" up="5" down="15"][vc_column_text]Since the ocean is 14 inches higher than it was in 19505, basic high tides turn into floods. It’s like a bathtub filled close to the top: a small increase, like a king tide (extreme high tide), can push the water over the edge and into the streets. As the sea level continues to rise, the bathtub is even fuller, causing higher flooding more often.[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" up="25"][vc_single_image image="23932" img_size="full" qode_css_animation="" title="King Tide 1950 - 2018"][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width="1/2"][vc_single_image image="23933" img_size="full" alignment="center" qode_css_animation=""][vc_separator type="transparent" up="25" down="25"][vc_column_text] MOST FLOODING HAPPENS DURING KING TIDES[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="small" position="left" color="#000000" transparency="1" up="5" down="15"][vc_column_text]King tides are unusually high tides that are created during months when the moon aligns with the sun. The combined gravitational pull of the moon and the sun creates much higher tides, called king tides. In places like Southeast Florida, king tides can be more than a foot higher than normal. Add that to the 14 inches of sea level rise since 1950 and you end up with flooding even on sunny days.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="full_width" angled_section="no" text_align="left" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern" background_color="#eaeaea" z_index=""][vc_column][vc_separator type="transparent" up="25" down="25"][vc_row_inner row_type="row" type="grid" text_align="left" css_animation=""][vc_column_inner][vc_column_text] FLOODING IN VIRGINIA, EVEN WHEN THERE IS NO RAIN [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="small" position="center" color="#000000" transparency="1" up="10" down="20"][vc_column_text] Drainage systems are designed to channel excess rainwater from the streets and drain it into the sea. But with the pressure from rising sea levels and higher tides, seawater can get pushed into these pipes and spill out into the streets. This causes flooding even on days without rain. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" up="25"][vc_gallery type="image_grid" images="23934,23935" img_size="full" onclick="" column_number="2" grayscale="no" enable_drag="no" images_space="gallery_with_space"][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_separator type="transparent" up="25" down="25"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row row_type="parallax" parallax_content_width="full_width" text_align="left" full_screen_section_height="no" section_height="800"][vc_column][vc_row_inner row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left" css_animation=""][vc_column_inner][qode_elliptical_slider autoplay="yes"][qode_elliptical_slide image="24071" elliptical_section_background_color="#ffffff"][vc_column_text] INCREASED STORM SURGE FLOODING IN NORTHERN VIRGINIA, MARYLAND, AND WASHINGTON, D.C. AREA.Hurricane Matthew never made landfall in Virginia, but the storm surge was damaging.5  Unfortunately, slightly higher sea levels make hurricanes even more damaging. Just a few more inches of sea level rise allow a hurricane to push more water onto the land, even if the hurricane itself doesn’t make landfall.Higher sea levels create a higher launching point for storm surge. These small changes in sea level rise are enough to turn what were 100-year storm surges into much more frequent events. In fact, in a third of 55 coastal sites studied throughout the US, 100-year storm surges will be 10-year or more frequent events by 2050.6This means that in many coastal cities, if you bought a house with a 30-year mortgage today, by the time you paid off your mortgage you could be experiencing extreme 100-year storm surges ten times more frequently due to sea level rise alone. This does not include the added risk of more intense storms resulting from warmer water and a warmer atmosphere, which could further increase storm surge damage.[/vc_column_text][/qode_elliptical_slide][/qode_elliptical_slider][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="full_width" angled_section="no" text_align="left" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern" z_index=""][vc_column][vc_row_inner row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left" css_animation=""][vc_column_inner][vc_separator type="transparent" up="25" down="25"][vc_column_text] What’s At Risk Of Flooding? [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" up="10" down="20"][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_row_inner row_type="row" use_as_box="use_row_as_box" type="grid" text_align="left" css_animation="" border_color="#000000" padding_top="15" padding_bottom="25"][vc_column_inner][qode_item_showcase image_top_offset="-70px" item_image="23944"][qode_item_showcase_list_item icon="fa-road" item_position="left" item_title="ROADS" item_text="Flooding can swamp low-lying roads, making your commute difficult or impossible." item_link="https://www.flooddoctorva.com/storm-damage-repair/" icon_color="#ffffff" icon_background_color="#000000"][/qode_item_showcase][qode_item_showcase image_top_offset="-70px" item_image="23938"][qode_item_showcase_list_item icon="fa-link" item_position="left" item_title="SEWAGE SYSTEMS" item_text="High seas mean more underground pressure on sewage systems. Sewage flooding can be a costly and smelly problem as well as a health hazard." item_link="https://www.flooddoctorva.com/toxic-water-damage-repair/" icon_color="#ffffff" icon_background_color="#000000"][/qode_item_showcase][qode_item_showcase image_top_offset="-70px" item_image="23939"][qode_item_showcase_list_item icon="fa-home" item_position="left" item_title="RESIDENTIAL HOMES" item_text="Storm surges or flooding can damage the underside of your car or the first level of your home." item_link="https://www.flooddoctorva.com/water-damage-home-repair/" icon_color="#ffffff" icon_background_color="#000000"][/qode_item_showcase][qode_item_showcase image_top_offset="-70px" item_image="23942"][qode_item_showcase_list_item icon="fa-hospital-o" item_position="left" item_title="SCHOOLS AND HOSPITALS" item_text="Flooding can impact critical community resources such as neighborhood schools and hospitals." item_link="https://www.flooddoctorva.com/commercial-restoration-services/" icon_color="#ffffff" icon_background_color="#000000"][/qode_item_showcase][qode_item_showcase image_top_offset="-70px" item_image="23941"][qode_item_showcase_list_item icon="fa-tint" item_position="left" item_title="DRINKING WATER" item_text="The ocean is salty, and as it rises higher, that salty water sometimes will mix with drinking water, ruining water wells." item_link="https://www.flooddoctorva.com/storm-damage-repair/" icon_color="#ffffff" icon_background_color="#000000"][/qode_item_showcase][qode_item_showcase image_top_offset="-70px" item_image="23943"][qode_item_showcase_list_item icon="fa-anchor" item_position="left" item_title="BEACHES" item_text="Rising seas increase the speed of beach erosion, pulling more sand from the beach into sea. Replacing the sand is possible, but expensive." item_link="https://www.flooddoctorva.com/storm-damage-repair/" icon_color="#ffffff" icon_background_color="#000000"][/qode_item_showcase][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="full_width" angled_section="no" text_align="left" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern" background_color="#ffffff" padding_top="25" z_index=""][vc_column][vc_column_text] Implementing Solutions [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="small" position="center" color="#000000" up="5" down="15"][vc_column_text]We Can Take Action To Protect Our Coastal CommunitiesFlooding Does Not Have To Be A Way Of Life For Coastal Communities[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" up="15" down="15"][vc_row_inner row_type="row" type="grid" text_align="left" css_animation=""][vc_column_inner][vc_column_text]Flooding due to sea level rise is a big challenge, but there are solutions to keep our coastal communities safe. Individuals, mayors, governors, and Congress can work together to build protections before flooding, to build back stronger after flooding, and to create plans that future-proof our communities.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_separator type="transparent" up="15" down="15"][vc_row_inner row_type="row" type="grid" text_align="left" css_animation="" background_color="#ffffff" border_color="#000000" padding_top="25" padding_bottom="25"][vc_column_inner][qode_workflow animate="no" line_color="#000000"][qode_workflow_item title_tag="h3" image_alignment="right" image="23973" circle_border_color="#1e73be" circle_background_color="#ffffff" title="Individual Solutions" text="Individuals can take steps to protect their homes and property from flood damage and urge local officials to take action to keep their communities safe."][qode_workflow_item title_tag="h3" image_float="yes" image_alignment="left" image="23971" circle_border_color="#000000" circle_background_color="#ffffff" title="Local Solutions" text="Local officials can prioritize sea level rise and take action locally to protect the community, as well as coordinate with state and federal officials for practical solutions."][qode_workflow_item title_tag="h3" image_alignment="right" image="23972" circle_border_color="#000000" circle_background_color="#ffffff" title="State & Federal Solutions" text="State and federal officials must help fund practical community solutions and incentivize smart planning in state and federal programs."][qode_workflow_item circle_border_color="#ffffff" circle_background_color="#ffffff"][/qode_workflow][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="full_width" angled_section="no" text_align="left" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern" background_color="#566573" padding_top="25" padding_bottom="25" z_index=""][vc_column][vc_row_inner row_type="row" type="grid" text_align="left" css_animation=""][vc_column_inner][icon_list_item icon="fa-home" icon_type="transparent" icon_size="25" icon_color="#ffffff" title="INDIVIDUAL SOLUTIONS" title_color="#ffffff" title_size="35" margin_bottom="25"][vc_column_text]YOU CAN TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR HOME FROM FLOODING[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="small" position="left" color="#ffffff" transparency="1" up="10" down="25"][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_row_inner row_type="row" type="grid" text_align="left" css_animation=""][vc_column_inner width="2/3"][image_with_text image="24173" title_color="rgba(255,255,255,0.5)"][/image_with_text][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width="1/3"][vc_column_text]While these steps are effective, they can also be expensive and time-consuming. Permanent solutions require action at the local, state and federal levels to keep flood water out of our streets and homes.Individuals can play an important role to inform their local officials of the risks they face from flooding and support local actions that protect the community and lower flood insurance premiums.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="full_width" angled_section="no" text_align="left" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern" background_color="#566573" border_color="#1e73be" padding_top="25" padding_bottom="25" z_index=""][vc_column][vc_row_inner row_type="row" type="grid" text_align="left" css_animation=""][vc_column_inner][qode_numbered_process][qode_numbered_process_item title_position="under-image" number="1" title="Get smart on your flooding risk" image="24210" number_color="#ffffff" number_background_color="#000000" title_color="#ffffff"][qode_numbered_process_item title_position="under-image" number="2" title="Insure against the risk of flooding!" image="24211" title_color="#ffffff" number_color="#ffffff" number_background_color="#000000"][qode_numbered_process_item title_position="under-image" number="3" title="Make changes to protect your home" image="24179" number_color="#ffffff" number_background_color="#000000" title_color="#ffffff"][/qode_numbered_process][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_row_inner row_type="row" type="grid" text_align="left" css_animation="" padding_top="25" padding_bottom="25"][vc_column_inner][vc_separator type="transparent" up="25"][vc_text_separator title="HOW CAN YOU PROTECT YOUR HOME" i_icon_material="vc-material vc-material-home" border="no" background_color="#1e73be" title_color="#ffffff"][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_row_inner row_type="row" type="grid" text_align="left" css_animation=""][vc_column_inner width="1/2"][vc_column_text] Buying Flood Insurance [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="small" position="left" color="#ffffff" transparency="1" up="10" down="25"][vc_column_text] Since typical homeowners’ insurance does not cover damage from flooding, it makes buying flood insurance a smart bet for many homeowners – even outside of FEMA’s designated flood zones. Flood insurance premiums can be reduced when the community takes action to decrease its overall risk and when individuals take steps to make their homes safer. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent"][vc_column_text]Premiums depend on each home’s specific risk, with an average premium of $700 per year.[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent"][button size="medium" style="white" icon="fa-link" target="_self" hover_type="default" text_align="center" text="Understanding Flood Insurance" link="#" color="#000000" hover_color="rgba(255,255,255,0.5)" background_color="#ffffff" hover_background_color="rgba(30,115,190,0.1)" border_color="#ffffff" hover_border_color="#1e73be" border_radius="1"][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width="1/2"][vc_single_image image="24229" img_size="full" alignment="center" qode_css_animation=""][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_separator type="transparent" up="25" down="25"][vc_row_inner row_type="row" type="grid" text_align="left" css_animation=""][vc_column_inner width="1/4"][vc_single_image image="24244" img_size="full" alignment="center" qode_css_animation=""][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width="3/4"][vc_column_text]RAISING THE EXPENSIVE STUFF[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="small" position="left" color="#ffffff" transparency="1" up="10" down="25"][vc_column_text]Homeowners experiencing repeated flooding can raise HVAC systems, plumbing, and electric meters currently on their basement or ground level to above flood levels. This can prevent future damage to expensive systems and could reduce flood insurance premiums as well.[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent"][vc_column_text] $6,000 or more to elevate HVAC systems, plumbing, and electric meters. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" down="25"][vc_column_text]ELEVATING HOUSES[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="small" position="left" color="#ffffff" transparency="1" up="10" down="25"][vc_column_text]Houses can be raised above flood levels by using six-foot tall wooden stilts or concrete blocks. And even if the house won’t flood, the driveway and the roads around it still may. It is easier for a new home to be built higher, but existing homes can also be raised. Often, rebuilding happens when FEMA grants money after a disaster like Hurricane Andrew. These grants can often cover the majority of the cost of rebuilding.[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent"][vc_column_text] $130,000 (median price) [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" down="25"][vc_column_text]RELOCATING[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="small" position="left" color="#ffffff" transparency="1" up="10" down="25"][vc_column_text]For houses that are in areas of extreme flooding, one option is to relocate to higher ground. To relocate, a house is lifted off its foundation, hauled to a new site, and lowered onto a new foundation.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="full_width" angled_section="no" text_align="left" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern" background_color="#5499c7" padding_top="25" padding_bottom="25" z_index=""][vc_column][vc_row_inner row_type="row" type="grid" text_align="left" css_animation=""][vc_column_inner][icon_list_item icon="fa-industry" icon_type="transparent" icon_size="25" icon_color="#ffffff" title="LOCAL SOLUTIONS" title_color="#ffffff" title_size="35" margin_bottom="25"][vc_column_text]CITIES NEED TO TAKE THE LEAD TO PROTECT AGAINST FLOODING[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="small" position="left" color="#ffffff" transparency="1" up="10" down="25"][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_row_inner row_type="row" type="grid" text_align="left" css_animation=""][vc_column_inner width="2/3"][image_with_text image="24282" title_color="rgba(255,255,255,0.5)"] We Can Take Action To Protect Our CommunitiesLasting solutions require action at the individual, local, state and federal levels working together.[/image_with_text][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width="1/3"][vc_column_text]With bold leadership and smart planning, communities can limit the damage from flooding and protect their schools, hospitals, and roads, as well as the local economy.Local action can also lower the cost of homeowner’s flood insurance premiums, helping them to save hundreds of dollars each year. While local communities are the first line of defense, they need support from the state and federal level to be successful.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="full_width" angled_section="no" text_align="left" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern" background_color="#5499c7" padding_top="25" z_index=""][vc_column][vc_row_inner row_type="row" type="grid" text_align="left" css_animation=""][vc_column_inner][qode_numbered_process][qode_numbered_process_item title_position="under-image" number="1" title="Communicating the risks of flooding" image="24285" number_color="#ffffff" number_background_color="#000000" title_color="#ffffff"][qode_numbered_process_item title_position="under-image" number="2" title="Creating a basic plan for critical infrastructure" image="24286" title_color="#ffffff" number_color="#ffffff" number_background_color="#000000"][qode_numbered_process_item title_position="under-image" number="3" title="Beginning to take immediate action to lower flood insurance premiums" image="24327" number_color="#ffffff" number_background_color="#000000" title_color="#ffffff"][/qode_numbered_process][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_row_inner row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left" css_animation="" padding_top="25"][vc_column_inner][vc_separator type="transparent" up="25"][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_row_inner row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left" css_animation="" background_color="#ffffff" padding_bottom="25" css=".vc_custom_1525722360803{background-color: #ffffff !important;}"][vc_column_inner width="9/12" css=".vc_custom_1525720317526{background-color: #ffffff !important;}"][vc_text_separator title="HOW CAN LOCAL OFFICIALS MAKE A DIFFERENCE" i_icon_material="vc-material vc-material-home" border="no" background_color="#1e73be" title_color="#ffffff"][qode_workflow animate="no" line_color="#1e73be"][qode_workflow_item image_alignment="left" image="24293" circle_border_color="#1e73be" circle_background_color="#ffffff" title="Building Seawalls" text="Seawalls are built on the coast to decrease flooding from tides and storms. They are often built to a height of five to six feet above sea level. To reduce flooding, old seawalls will need to be repaired and raised higher as the seas rise. Raising seawalls by 12 inches costs about $60 per foot. New seawalls often cost $600 to $2,000 per linear foot. `{`2`}`" subtitle="Building Seawalls New York City is building a $335 million flood wall in Manhattan. `{`1`}`"][qode_workflow_item image_alignment="left" image="24298" circle_border_color="#1e73be" circle_background_color="#ffffff" title="Raising Roads" text="Raising roads above sea level can help drain water and reduce tidal flooding. In order to make sure that higher roads don’t channel flood waters to homes and stores at lower elevations, cities often use stormwater pumps to remove this excess water." subtitle="Miami Beach is raising its roads by two feet at a cost of roughly $2 million per `{`3`}`"][qode_workflow_item image_alignment="left" image="24299" circle_border_color="#1e73be" circle_background_color="#ffffff" title="Building Stormwater Pumps" text="With higher seas, water doesn’t drain out as easily. Pumps can speed up the process of getting water out of the streets by vacuuming up the flood water and releasing it back into the sea." subtitle="Norfolk, Virginia needs $70 million for pumps and drains by Ohio Creek `{`4`}`"][qode_workflow_item image_alignment="left" image="24301" circle_border_color="#1e73be" circle_background_color="#ffffff" title="Upgrading Sewage Systems" text="Flooding can disrupt sewage systems and in particular, threaten septic tanks. Since saltwater is corrosive, it can break tanks and cause sewage to spew out, creating a smelly problem as well as a health hazard. Towns can upgrade sewage systems so that stormwater doesn’t seep into pipes, upgrade septic tanks, or replace them with sewer lines for about $15,000 per replacement." subtitle="Florida’s Broward County has spent over $250 million to eliminate septic tanks `{`5`}`"][qode_workflow_item image_alignment="left" image="24302" circle_border_color="#1e73be" circle_background_color="#ffffff" title="Using Beaches As Barriers" text="Beaches and dunes can act like a natural wall that reduces the impact of storm surges. The bigger the beach, the more water it stops from reaching homes and roads. Towns can add sand to make beaches bigger or to protect them against erosion. Using this type of natural infrastructure can protect against flooding while maintaining beaches for the community to enjoy." subtitle="Norfolk has planned a $18.4 million project to engineer a beach at Ocean View to reduce flooding. `{`6`}`"][qode_workflow_item image_alignment="left" image="24310" circle_border_color="#1e73be" circle_background_color="#ffffff" title="Creating Natural Infrastructure" text="Coastal communities can restore natural infrastructure that can act as a buffer against storms and coastal flooding. Natural structures such as barrier islands, oyster and coral reefs, mangroves, seagrass and salt marshes can work in unison with built infrastructure, such as seawalls, to absorb storm surges. These projects are often cost-effective and can improve the natural environment for the community. `{`8`}`" subtitle="Palm Beach County is spending $17 million to create mangroves, oyster reefs, marsh and seagrass habitats on 70 acres of land. `{`7`}`"][qode_workflow_item image_alignment="left" image="24330" circle_border_color="#1e73be" circle_background_color="#ffffff" title="Slowing Land Sinkage" text="In places like Hampton Roads, the land is sinking in part because so much groundwater has been pumped out that the land is caving in to fill the empty space. Towns can slow down land sinkage by limiting further groundwater pumping and initiating pilot projects to reverse land sinkage. In Hampton Roads, a pilot project called SWIFT will begin experimenting with injecting a million gallons of purified wastewater in the ground per day, starting in 2018." subtitle="Hampton Roads Sewage District has planned a $25 million pilot project to inject water underground to slow land sinkage. The project budget could increase to $1 billion.`{`9`}`"][qode_workflow_item][/qode_workflow][vc_separator type="transparent" up="25"][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width="3/12" css=".vc_custom_1525720297232{background-color: #ffffff !important;}"][vc_text_separator title="Sources" i_icon_material="vc-material vc-material-home" border="no" background_color="#1e73be" title_color="#ffffff"][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="full_width" angled_section="no" text_align="left" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern" background_color="#5499c7" padding_top="25" padding_bottom="25" z_index=""][vc_column][vc_row_inner row_type="row" type="grid" text_align="left" css_animation=""][vc_column_inner][icon_list_item icon="fa-globe" icon_type="transparent" icon_size="25" icon_color="#ffffff" title="STATE AND FEDERAL SOLUTIONS" title_color="#ffffff" title_size="35" margin_bottom="25"][vc_column_text]Sea Level Rise Flooding Is Already Impacting Our National Security, Our Economy, And Our Citizens Up And Down The Coast[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="small" position="left" color="#ffffff" transparency="1" up="10" down="25"][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_row_inner row_type="row" type="grid" text_align="left" css_animation=""][vc_column_inner width="2/3"][image_with_text image="24335" title_color="rgba(255,255,255,0.5)"]What state and federal actions are needed to fix our flooding[/image_with_text][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width="1/3"][vc_column_text]This national challenge must be met with national solutions. State and national action is critical to give coastal communities the tools they need to protect themselves and the military bases, ports, and highways that support the rest of the country.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="full_width" angled_section="no" text_align="left" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern" background_color="#5499c7" padding_top="25" padding_bottom="25" z_index=""][vc_column][vc_row_inner row_type="row" type="grid" text_align="left" css_animation=""][vc_column_inner][qode_numbered_process][qode_numbered_process_item title_position="under-image" number="1" title="Communicating the risks of flooding" image="24285" number_color="#ffffff" number_background_color="#000000" title_color="#ffffff"][qode_numbered_process_item title_position="under-image" number="2" title="Creating a basic plan for critical infrastructure" image="24286" title_color="#ffffff" number_color="#ffffff" number_background_color="#000000"][qode_numbered_process_item title_position="under-image" number="3" title="Beginning to take immediate action to lower flood insurance premiums" image="24327" number_color="#ffffff" number_background_color="#000000" title_color="#ffffff"][/qode_numbered_process][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="full_width" angled_section="no" text_align="left" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern" background_color="#5499c7" padding_top="25" padding_bottom="25" z_index=""][vc_column][vc_text_separator title="WHAT CAN STATE AND FEDERAL OFFICIALS DO ABOUT SEA LEVEL RISING" i_icon_material="vc-material vc-material-home" border="no" background_color="#1e73be" title_color="#ffffff"][vc_row_inner row_type="row" type="grid" text_align="left" css_animation=""][vc_column_inner width="1/4"][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width="1/2"][vc_column_text] National And State Officials Can Take Four Actions To Empower Coastal Towns To Tackle Sea Level Rise Flooding. [/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width="1/4"][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_row_inner row_type="row" type="grid" text_align="left" css_animation="" padding_top="25" padding_bottom="25"][vc_column_inner][vc_separator type="transparent" up="15"][qode_numbered_process number_of_items="four" line_skin="light"][qode_numbered_process_item title_position="under-image" number="1" title="Increase Funding For Local Infrastructure" image="24378" number_color="#ffffff" number_background_color="#1e73be" title_color="#ffffff"][qode_numbered_process_item title_position="under-image" image="24378" number="2" title="Protect Our Military Bases" number_color="#ffffff" number_background_color="#1e73be" title_color="#ffffff"][qode_numbered_process_item title_position="under-image" image="24378" number="3" title="Hardwire Flood Prevention Into Federal Programs" number_color="#ffffff" number_background_color="#1e73be" title_color="#ffffff"][qode_numbered_process_item title_position="under-image" number="4" title="Give Local Communities The Tools To Plan Smart" image="24378" number_color="#ffffff" number_background_color="#1e73be" title_color="#ffffff"][/qode_numbered_process][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_separator type="transparent" down="25"][vc_row_inner row_type="row" type="grid" text_align="left" css_animation="" padding_top="25" padding_bottom="25"][vc_column_inner width="1/4" css=".vc_custom_1525817129061{border-radius: 1px !important;}"][vc_column_text] Building infrastructure that reduces flooding saves money and protects citizens, but most towns don’t have enough money to pay for it on their own [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" down="10"][vc_column_text]The federal government should help local communities pay for protections against flooding today, rather than waiting for disasters to strike that cost taxpayers billions of dollars. Federal and state governments can also get more from the money they are already spending by incentivizing smart planning. They can require projects that receive funding to protect against flooding and provide more funding to help them do so.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width="1/4" css=".vc_custom_1525817139614{border-radius: 1px !important;}"][vc_column_text] The national government needs to understand the risks to major military bases and fund the projects necessary to protect them from flooding. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" up="25" down="10"][vc_column_text]Sixteen of our military bases on the East Coast will have flooding 100 times per year by 2050. This puts our military readiness and equipment at risk. Some bases, like Langley Air Force Base in Virginia, are already taking action to protect against sea level rise, but we need coordinated national action to ensure our military bases are prepared. Even when military bases take action to remain dry, flooded roads can keep our servicemen from being able to reach the base to deploy, something that is already a challenge at Norfolk Naval base. The military needs more flexibility to invest in projects outside the base to make sure servicemen can deploy quickly to keep our country safe.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width="1/4" css=".vc_custom_1525817188462{border-radius: 1px !important;}"][vc_column_text] The government already spends billions of dollars on disaster relief, affordable housing, and other programs that impact our communities’ flood risk. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" down="10"][vc_column_text]With those same dollars, we can protect our communities from flooding and reduce spending for disaster relief. Proactive protection pays off – FEMA found that for every $1 spent on pre-disaster mitigation, we save $4 in disaster relief. While the Department of Housing and Urban Development finances housing in every coastal state, these dollars could go further if states and developers were required to consider the risk of flooding in their plans. And when the national government spends billions to rebuild after disasters, we need to build back stronger so our communities can withstand future flooding – and do not keep drawing on taxpayer dollars to rebuild time and time again.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width="1/4" css=".vc_custom_1525817200949{border-radius: 1px !important;}"][vc_column_text] Many coastal communities are already taking action to combat sea level rise flooding, but they need tools and coordination for better planning. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" up="25" down="10"][vc_column_text]Local communities rely on federal FEMA flood maps to understand their flooding risk and take action. Currently, around 15% of these maps have not been updated since the 1970s or 1980s, and none of the maps include sea level rise. The federal government needs to update these maps to give local communities accurate data. Without accurate maps, we’re asking our local communities to fight sea level rise flooding with one hand tied behind their back. State and federal governments can also play an important role in understanding our country’s overall risk and coordinating efforts between communities.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="grid" angled_section="no" text_align="left" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern" z_index="" background_color="#ffffff"][vc_column][qode_blog_carousel_titled posts_shown="5" title_background_color="#000000" title_color="#ffffff" number="4"][/vc_column][/vc_row]...